Elise Betrus

 

“In the woods, the mask that society compels one to wear is cast aside, and the restraints which the thousand eyes and reckless tongues about him fasten on the heart, are thrown off, and the soul rejoices in its liberty and again becomes a child in action.” – Joel Tyler Headley

IMG_2618 Elise Betrus. Hanging Egg Sac, 2013. Wood and glass.

IMG_2641 Elise Betrus. Nested Egg Sac, 2013. Wood, glass, sand, bark.

IMG_2635Elise Betrus. Nested Egg Sac, 2013. Wood, glass, sand, bark. (Detail)

IMG_2696Elise Betrus. Origins, 2013. Wood, glass, sand.

IMG_2688Elise Betrus. Origins, 2013. Wood, glass, sand. (Detail)

 

Slide8 Elise Betrus and Haley Jelinek. Home Roots, 2012. Wood, glass, light.

IMG_1607 Elise Betrus and Haley Jelinek. Home Roots, 2012. Wood, glass, light. (Detail)

 

Artist Statement

I base much of my work around the idea of why things and people are the way they are, and why differences
within experiences cause differences in outcomes. I examine this in people as well as in nature, because I feel
that in the case of people they are too often judged for being the way that they are and those judging do not stop
often enough to ask themselves why those being judged may be the way they are. I tie this to the idea of home
because home is where we are shaped into adults, and as children we have no say in where home is or who
mom and dad are, it is simply the nature of our origins. Likewise a tree does not get to decide what kind of tree it
will become it is born that way from a seed, and that seed will not choose where to start rooting based off of
anything other than survival. When we look at the whole picture we see that we are all simply human, no more,
no less, and that we all will one day die and the circle of life will continue. I would like to see more people
understanding that just because someone is “weird” or fat or dumb or smells bad, it doesn’t make them a bad
person, and they do not need to be looked down upon for such differences. For they are only human and nobody
is perfect, and I think we could all learn a lot from giving everyone an equal amount of acknowledgement in day
to day life. It can be as simple as a smile in passing, but it can represent an appreciation for all living things.

Prices or additional information please contact Elise  – erb4(at)alfred.edu

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s